Mid-Year Report: My 2013 Travel So Far

As the mid-way point of 2013 has come and gone, I’ve been meaning to assess how much I have actually traveled so far this year.  It feels like the entire month of June I was out of the country, and I know I’ve spent plenty of weekends on the left coast, or in another country all together.  So, I went ahead and updated my flight history at Flight Diary.net, and my 2013 map looks a little like this:

Red / Organe = Traveled in 2013 White = Scheduled in 2013

Red / Orange = Traveled in 2013
White = Scheduled in 2013

Well, as it turns out, I’ve traveled a whole, whole bunch.  Though I’ve taken four different international trips, a good bulk of my flying has been transcontinental, domestic trips to the West Coast.  While this may seem miserable, life ain’t bad considering that I was upgraded to first class on a relatively high percentage of my flights.  I’ve also enjoyed meeting friends for lunch in San Francisco, for beer tours in Portland, or for weekends full of shenanigans in San Diego or Vegas.

Domestic Flying 2013

Domestic Flying 2013 (Red/Orange = flown; White = scheduled)

Yup, it appears I’ve already flown over 100,000 miles on 55 flights, so far this year — 100,793, to be exact!  Thus far, I’ve visited:

  • 29 cities
  • 8 countries (5 new — Turkey, Brazil, Argentina, Chile, and UAE)
  • 4 continents (North America, South America, Europe, and Asia)

With all this flying, most of which has been focused on United or one of its Star Alliance Partners, I have just about hit Premier 1K Status with United, which is United’s top achievable status.  Only about 4,500 premier qualification miles left until I do so!

Screen Shot 2013-07-23 at 10.52.36 PMScreen Shot 2013-07-23 at 10.52.52 PM

Though I’m taking a break from travel for the next few weeks, I have a full slate of travel scheduled for this fall and winter, including scheduled trips this year to:

  • Rio De Janeiro, Brazil for Labor Day Weekend
  • Europe (Oslo, Copenhagen, Munich) for a Frequent Flyer event with Star Alliance and SAS, and Opening Day of Oktoberfest
  • Europe (Munich, London, Edinburgh) for Closing Weekend of Oktoberfest and my annual EuroTrip with friends
  • Sydney and Cairns, Australia (Sydney for New Years and Cairns to dive the Great Barrier Reef)

I’ll also be taking several weekend, domestic trips to:

  • Auburn, Alabama (twice for football — War Eagle!)
  • Atlanta for a wedding
  • Tampa, FL
  • Houston and College Station, TX for football
  • Raleigh, NC

All in all, this year will mark the most travel I’ve ever done in one year… and I’m loving every bit of it!  In some of my upcoming posts, I’ll detail how I’m able to travel so much, and how I find the deals, so stay tuned!

 

DC to Dubai and Tokyo via… Santiago? Four Days in Tokyo: Day 4

Introduction
Planning
TAM Economy Class New York JFK – Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro
Santiago
LAN Economy Class Santiago – Sao Paulo
TAM Economy Class Sao Paulo – New York JFK
United BusinessFirst Denver to Tokyo Seattle (Emergency Landing)
United BusinessFirst on the 787 Seattle to Tokyo
Cathay Pacific Regional Business Class Tokyo Narita – Hong Kong
Cathay Pacific “The Wing” Business Class Lounge Hong Kong
Cathay Pacific Business Class Hong Kong – Dubai
Dubai, Day 1 (Traiteur Brunch, Park Hyatt Dubai, Burj Khalifa, Atlantis Palm Islands)
Dubai, Day 2 (Shark Dive at Dubai Aquarium, Burj Al Arab, 360)
Cathay Pacific Business Class Dubai – Hong Kong – Tokyo Haneda
Tokyo, Day 1 (Park Hyatt arrival, Roppongi)
Tokyo, Day 2 (Imperial Palace, Shibuya Crossing, Ebisu, Kendo, Dinner and drinks in Shinjuku)
Tokyo, Day 3 (Ramen lunch, Harajuku, Meiji Shrine, Baseball at the Tokyo Dome, Dinner at New York Grill)
Tokyo, Day 4 (Tsukiji Market, Tokyo Subway, Airport Transfers)
Park Hyatt Tokyo


…Continued from Day 3 

Tsukiji Market

Since this was to be my last day in Tokyo, I wanted to make it to the famous Tsukiji  Market.  This is probably one of the most famous seafood markets anywhere in the world.  Every morning, the tuna boats unload their fresh catches, and they are sold at auction.  One can witness the auction by showing up early (think 4am), but I have a hard enough time being up by 7am.  So after arriving at Tsukijishijo station (a straight shot from Shinjuku), I walked around the market a bit, and then went in search of some fresh, off-the-boat sushi!  I read the top two sushi places in Tsukiji (and in Tokyo, for that matter) were Sushi Dai and Daiwazushi.   After it was apparent that I wasn’t getting into Sushi Dai without waiting for hours, I went to Dawiazushi, which had a smaller, but still substantial line.

Tsukiji Market

Tsukiji Market

The line at Daiwazushi at Tsukiji Market

The line at Daiwazushi at Tsukiji Market

I got into the line, about 25 people back and the “host / line-control / bouncer” asked how many people were in my party.  I replied that it was only me, and that resulted in me being seated immediately.  I ordered the set menu for 3500 yen, the “Omakase Chef Choice”, as anyone should, and what came out was nothing short of amazing.  It was easily the best sushi I have ever had.  I’m certainly not a sushi snob, but after eating this, I maybe ruined for life when eating “lesser” quality sushi.  I can’t describe how fresh it was — I mean, it came off the boat just hours prior to me putting it in my belly.  A trip here is a MUST-DO experience when you’re in Tokyo.  You seriously cannot skip at trip here.  If you’re a sushi fan, this is pretty much as good as it gets — probably the best sushi in the world.

Daiwazushi

Daiwazushi

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Tai (Red Snapper) nigiri, Uni (sea urcin) nigiri, and Ikura (salmon roe) and magura (tuna) maki roll

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Toro (fatty tuna) nigiri

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Shrimp and Fatty Tuna Nigiri

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Tomago yaki (egg) and Saba (makeral) nigiri

After Tsukiji, I went back to the hotel to pack my suitcase in preparation for my trip to Narita airport later that afternoon.  Later in the morning, I enjoyed breakfast at Grirandole in the lobby of the Park Hyatt Tokyo.  After finishing breakfast, I gathered my things, and headed downstairs to catch my limousine bus to Tokyo-Narita airport.  This was pre-arranged with the concierge for 3000 yen.  The drive out to the airport took over 90 minutes, as Narita is nowhere near downtown Tokyo.

 Tokyo Subway / Getting Around

Tokyo is home to the world’s largest and most extensive subway system.  It is extremely easy to use and to get around.  There are two main lines, Tokyo Metro and the Toei Subway.  Together, this system is composed of 13 lines to 290 stations, with a daily ridership of over 8.9 million passengers.  The subway system is extremely orderly, though a bit overwhelming and crowded.

Orderly chaos of the Tokyo Subway

Gates at the Tokyo Subway — DC sure could use these!

Luckily, there are subway stations seemingly everywhere, and they are pretty cheap (120 – 4o0 yen, each way).  Given the astronomical taxi cab rates in Tokyo, the subway was my primary and preferred means of transportation throughout the city.  If you’re out late, its importatnt to note that the last train is around 1am, so if you miss that, an expensive cab becomes necessary.  A great refrence for getting around on the Tokyo Subway can be found on this wikihow page.

 Airport Transfers

As mentioned before, I used the Airport Limousine Bus Service for both my arrival at Haneda Airport to the Park Hyatt in Shinjuku, and for my departure from the Park Hyatt to Narita Airport.  This is an extremely easy option, since the bus picks up and drops off from the hotel door.  This service is available at a number of Tokyo hotels and subway stations.  From Shinjuku, Haneda airport is about 45 minutes away, and Narita airport is 90-120 minutes — a much longer ride.

Overall Thoughts about Tokyo

Tokyo stole the show on this trip — it was without a doubt my favorite city that I visited during this fifteen day adventure.  Tokyo is the definition of a megalopolis, and there are so many different neighborhoods in the city.   I was in Tokyo for about 3-4 days, but I could have stayed for much longer.  With that said, I feel that I spent enough time here, unlike some of the other destinations on this trip.  The simple fact it is — Tokyo is so large, so expansive, and has so much to offer– that one could easily just focus on a few neighborhoods each time they visit.  There is no way you can see all of Tokyo in a week, or maybe even two.

The relatively concentrated areas I visited in Tokyo

The relatively concentrated areas I visited in Tokyo

To demonstrate this, above is a map with the geo-location tags for the pictures that I took while in Tokyo.  As you can see, I focused almost all of this trip in the west / southwest neighborhoods of Tokyo.  It’s the largest city (population-wise) in the world, and after four days here, Tokyo is certainly one of my favorite.

I will certainly be back!

DC to Dubai and Tokyo via… Santiago? Four Days in Tokyo: Day 3

Introduction
Planning
TAM Economy Class New York JFK – Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro
Santiago
LAN Economy Class Santiago – Sao Paulo
TAM Economy Class Sao Paulo – New York JFK
United BusinessFirst Denver to Tokyo Seattle (Emergency Landing)
United BusinessFirst on the 787 Seattle to Tokyo
Cathay Pacific Regional Business Class Tokyo Narita – Hong Kong
Cathay Pacific “The Wing” Business Class Lounge Hong Kong
Cathay Pacific Business Class Hong Kong – Dubai
Dubai, Day 1 (Traiteur Brunch, Park Hyatt Dubai, Burj Khalifa, Atlantis Palm Islands)
Dubai, Day 2 (Shark Dive at Dubai Aquarium, Burj Al Arab, 360)
Cathay Pacific Business Class Dubai – Hong Kong – Tokyo Haneda
Tokyo, Day 1 (Park Hyatt arrival, Roppongi)
Tokyo, Day 2 (Imperial Palace, Shibuya Crossing, Ebisu, Kendo, Dinner and drinks in Shinjuku)
Tokyo, Day 3 (Ramen lunch, Harajuku, Meiji Shrine, Baseball at the Tokyo Dome, Dinner at New York Grill)
Tokyo, Day 4 (Tsukiji Market, Tokyo Subway, Airport Transfers)
Park Hyatt Tokyo


…Continued from Day 2 

Harajuku and a Ramen Lunch

I slept in the following morning due to a pretty late night out.  My two friends departed in the morning to begin their trip back to Dubai via Kyoto and Hong Kong.  It was a dreary day in Tokyo, and I was hungry.  At that point, I had yet to try some decent ramen, and I planned to visit the Harajuku neighborhood and Meiji Shrine that afternoon, so I easily pin-pointed a top-rated ramen shop called Kyusu Jangara, which is right near the Harajuku station.   Apparently, it is one of the more famous ramen shops in Toyko, and the ramen was definitely delicious.

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Kyusu Jangara Ramen in Harajuku

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The “zembu-ire” Ramen at Kyusu Jangara

I ordered the specialty, “zembu-ire” or “with-everything” and it included Kyusu-style ramen noodles, egg, salted roe, and several large pieces of pork fat, which were amazing.   This was some of the best ramen I’ve ever enjoyed, though my favorite ramen place is still Toki Underground in Washington, DC.  If you’re ever in the District, go!

Anyway, after eating, I took a stroll through Harajuku.  The main strip in Harajuku is Takeshita Street – a pedestrian-only alleyway lined with some unique fashion boutiques, restaurants, and other shops.  The entrance to the street is located directly across from the JR East exit of Harajuku Station.  This area is the teenage fashion center of Tokyo, and it is definitely a sight to see.  This strip is a never-ending barrage of neon, anime, and oddly dressed, but supposedly fashionable Japanese teenagers and young adults.

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A rainy day on Takeshita Street in Harajuku

Ummm... Japanese fashion?

Ummm… Japanese fashion?

It’s worth it just to stroll down the street and take in the sights and sounds.  One of the crazier things you’ll see are lingerie-advertisement trucks blasting pop-music driving through the streets of Harajuku — truly bizarre!

Meiji Shrine

Located on the opposite side of Harajuku Station is the Meiji Shrine.  The Meiji Shrine is located in a 700,00 acre forest right in the middle of the Harajuku / Shibuya area of Tokyo.  I took a quick stroll through the forest and made the 3/4 mile walk to the actual shrine.  It was definitely impressive, and was pretty much exactly what I had expected.  The weather was pretty awful, so I went through the area pretty fast to “check it off my list.”  I’ll let the pictures speak for themselves:

Entrance to the Park

Entrance to the Park

Long walk to the shrine

Long walk to the shrine

Sake barrels

Sake barrels

Entrance to Meiji Shrine

Entrance to Meiji Shrine

Meiji Shrine

Meiji Shrine

Me at the Meiji Shrine

Me at the Meiji Shrine

 Tokyo Dome

After my visit to the Meiji Shrine, I went back to the Park Hyatt to rendevouz with another friend who happened to be in Tokyo the same time as me.  We met up, hit up the metro, and headed to the Kasuga station for a trip to the Tokyo Dome!  That evening, the Hokkaido Nippon-Ham Fighters were taking on the Fukuoka SoftBank Hawks in a Japanese baseball game!  I am a huge baseball fan, so a Japanese baseball game was high on my list of things to do in Tokyo.  And wow, what a different experience.  Though the game is the same, the crowd is quite a spectacle.

The famous Tokyo Dome!

The famous Tokyo Dome!

Panoramic of the Tokyo Dome

Panoramic of the Tokyo Dome

We sat in the outfield with all the crazy fans — they were constantly on their feet, screaming and belting out cheers.  The environment of the almost sold-out Tokyo Dome was more similar to that of an American college football game than a baseball game.  Overall, this was an amazing experience.  Oh, and the beer girls operate at another level of Japanese efficiency!

Insane Fans!

Insane Fans!

Yup, that's a keg.  On her back!  Kirin on tap?  Yes, please!

Yup, that’s a keg. On her back! Kirin on tap? Yes, please!

Dinner at the Park Hyatt’s  New York Grill

After the game, we were pretty tired, and wanted something pretty convenient.  Becauser of the late hour that we returned from the ballgame, we decided to try out the Park Hyatt’s iconic New York Grill for dinner.

The Park Hyatt Tokyo's famous New York Grill and Bar

The Park Hyatt Tokyo’s famous New York Grill and Bar

Famous from its starring role as the setting of the 2003 Bill Murray and Scarlett Johansson film, Lost in Translation, the Park Hyatt, and particularly the New York Bar & Grill feature some of the best vistas in all of Tokyo.    For dinner, I had a mixed salad and the Hokkaido Ribeye, which was excellent!

Hokkaido RIbeye at New York Grill

Hokkaido Ribeye at New York Grill

The dinner was pretty pricey, but then again, it was the New York Grill — at the Park Hyatt— in Tokyo.  So a cheap meal was not really expected.  After the meal, I was stuffed and decided to call it a night.

 To be continued with an installment for each day I spent in Tokyo…

Tokyo, Day 4 (Tsukiji Market, Tokyo Subway, Airport Transfers)

 

DC to Dubai and Tokyo via… Santiago?: Eight hours in Rio de Janeiro

Introduction
Planning
TAM Economy Class New York JFK – Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro
Santiago
LAN Economy Class Santiago – Sao Paulo
TAM Economy Class Sao Paulo – New York JFK
United BusinessFirst Denver to Tokyo Seattle (Emergency Landing)
United BusinessFirst on the 787 Seattle to Tokyo
Cathay Pacific Regional Business Class Tokyo Narita – Hong Kong
Cathay Pacific “The Wing” Business Class Lounge Hong Kong
Cathay Pacific Business Class Hong Kong – Dubai
Dubai, Day 1  (Traiteur Brunch, Park Hyatt Dubai, Burj Khalifa, Atlantis Palm Islands)
Dubai, Day 2 (Shark Dive at Dubai Aquarium, Burj Al Arab, 360)
Cathay Pacific Business Class Dubai – Hong Kong – Tokyo Haneda


 

My TAM flight arrived in Rio de Janeiro Terminal 2 a little after 6:30am, and I decided to proceed in the direction of transfer passengers despite the fact that my connecting flight to Santiago didn’t depart until 3:00pm.  I wanted to spend a bit of time in the lounge to charge my iPhone up since it would be functioning as my camera for the day.

Since I had been to the Rio airport a few months earlier, I was familiar with its layout, and knew exactly where the lounges were.  As I tried to check-in to the Smiles VIP lounge, which I used last time while traveling TAM, I was advised by the agent that there was a new lounge next door for TAM and LAN passengers, and that I could access that lounge as a Star Alliance Gold passenger.  So I popped on into the “SEA” lounge next door and was admitted quickly.

There was a small spread – almost identical to the spread in the other lounge, consisting of small appetizers, Brazilian pastries, and an assortment of drinks. The chairs were pretty uncomfortable, and the lounge had a pretty cold feeling to it.   It’s honestly not a lounge in which I’d care to spend much more than an hour.  However, the Wi-Fi worked great, and I was able to charge up my iPhone quickly.

Mission accomplished.

After about 45 minutes, it was time to trek into the city.  First thing was to find a place to store my luggage while I was gone.  I proceeded through immigration after a bit of initial confusion, and found the MALEX luggage lockers.  These are located outside on the departure levels of both Terminals 1 and 2.  You can get a locker for 12 Brazilian Real (about USD $6).  The exchange rate is approximately USD $1: 2..15 Brazilian Real at the present time.

I then looked for the blue bus with a yellow crown on it, the Real Auto Onibus.  This bus is really easy to take, and only costs 13 real each way.  It runs every 15 minutes, and normally takes about an hour to get to Ipanema or Copacabana, but since I was taking it on a Friday morning during rush hour, it ended up taking about an hour and a half to get to Ipanema.

The bus dropped me off right in the middle of Ipanema Beach after multiple stops.  The bus goes downtown, the Santos Dumont Airport, Copacabana, Ipanema, and Barra.

Ipanema!

Ipanema!

Ipanema

Ipanema

Ipanema

Ipanema

After walking to the end of Ipanema, I decided that it was time for a couple beers and an early lunch.  I settled on one of the many kiosks lining the beach.   Lunch was nothing special – a chicken sandwich (lame, I know).

Part of my lunch

Part of my lunch

It was a beautiful morning, and the beach really looked enticing.  Due to my limited time on this layover, I’d have to forgo getting in the water and save it for my next trip to Rio over Labor Day.

The water looked real nice

The water looked real nice

After lunch and a couple beers, it was approaching noon.  I figured that I had better start making my way back to the airport.  In order to get a bus on the way back, one must find the blue, “Real Onibus” bus with the destination of “Aeropuerto Internacional”.  They come by every 15 minutes, but there is no rhyme or reason as to where they actually stop.  So the best way to flag down one of these busses is to position oneself near a traffic light and wave like a crazy person when the bus is approaching. Again, it is 13 Brazilian Real (~USD$6.50) each way.

I boarded the bus, and we drove back along Copacabana.  There was much more activity along Copacabana on this day, and I briefly regretted not going there instead.  Oh well, I guess I’ll have to save it for the next trip.

 

Sandcastle on Copacabana welcoming tourists.  Rio is home to the 2013 Confederations Cup, the 2014 FIFA World Cup, and the 2016 Summer Olympics

Sandcastle on Copacabana welcoming tourists. Rio is home to the 2013 Confederations Cup, the 2014 FIFA World Cup, and the 2016 Summer Olympics

Anyway, the trip back to the airport was a little over an hour, and I arrived about 1:30pm.  After a quick trip through security and immigration, I headed back to the “Sea lounge” for a quick snack and a Fanta (when in Rome…).  Fifteen minutes later, my flight to Santiago was ready for boarding and I headed to the gate.

Overall, this was not a bad way to spend an eight-hour layover.  Instead of staying in the rather drab and boring Rio airport, I got to hangout along one of the more famous beaches in the world.

Not a bad way to spend the morning, that’s for sure.

DC to Dubai and Tokyo via… Santiago?: Planning

Introduction
Planning
TAM Economy Class New York JFK – Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro
Santiago
LAN Economy Class Santiago – Sao Paulo
TAM Economy Class Sao Paulo – New York JFK
United BusinessFirst Denver to Tokyo Seattle (Emergency Landing)
United BusinessFirst on the 787 Seattle to Tokyo
Cathay Pacific Regional Business Class Tokyo Narita – Hong Kong
Cathay Pacific “The Wing” Business Class Lounge Hong Kong
Cathay Pacific Business Class Hong Kong – Dubai
Dubai, Day 1  (Traiteur Brunch, Park Hyatt Dubai, Burj Khalifa, Atlantis Palm Islands)
Dubai, Day 2 (Shark Dive at Dubai Aquarium, Burj Al Arab, 360)
Cathay Pacific Business Class Dubai – Hong Kong – Tokyo Haneda


This monstrosity of a trip was actually the result of combining three different vacations.  I’ll split the planning out into three sections, outlying how I went about booking each portion, and the confluence of events that led to linking these trips together to create a 15-day, multi-continent adventure!

The original trip:  Denver to Tokyo on the 787 Dreamliner

In May 2012, on the day that United announced their first official international 787 Dreamliner route from Denver to Tokyo-Narita, they uploaded it into the schedule with an abnormally low price of ~$900 round-trip on their B-fare.  A United B-fare is a full-fare economy ticket, which would normally cost several thousands of dollars.  This sort of fare earns 1.5X Premier Qualifying Miles, which help one build United status.   Additionally, this fare was available for what was supposed to be the inaugural flight for this route, and the inaugural international 787 flight for United.  Several friends on Milepoint booked this same flight, so it was to be a “party-flight.”  A sub-$1,000 fare to Tokyo is pretty good in general, but the fact that this was a B-fare, and that this was supposed to be the inaugural flight made it a must-have.

Denver to Tokyo-Narita

Denver to Tokyo-Narita

I originally planned this trip to be March 31 through April 6, and planned to spend the week in Japan.  As it turns out, the 787 had its share of problems after its initial release, and was subsequently grounded in January.   By the end of February, United finally made the official announcement that the inaugural would be postponed to a later date, so this inaugural was no longer a possibility.  I was left contemplating when I wanted to change this flight to…

Another unrelated trip:  TAM airfare deal from New York to Santiago

In November 2012, an extremely low round-trip fare of ~$330 appeared for flights from New York or Miami to both Buenos Aires and Santiago on TAM Airlines (of Brazil) through Orbitz.  After a late-night call from a friend, I decided to book a couple of these flights – a trip to Buenos Aires in March 2013 and one to Santiago in June.

I ended up selecting a routing from New York-JFK to Santiago.  After a litany of schedule changes by TAM, and after dealing with a series of hour-long phone calls to Orbitz, I ultimately ended up with a trip from New York to Santiago, via Rio de Janeiro on the outbound and via Sao Paulo on the return.

New York-JFK to Santiago (SCL) via Rio de Janeiro (GIG) on outbound and Sao Paulo (GRU) on the return

New York-JFK to Santiago (SCL) via Rio de Janeiro (GIG) on outbound and Sao Paulo (GRU) on the return

Joining the gang in Dubai

As I pondered when I should take my DEN-NRT flight on the 787, I decided that I wanted to spend some time in Japan, but at the same time try to somehow get over to Dubai to meet a group of ten friends who would be there, and to see my old roommate who moved to Dubai last year.  They would all be in Dubai during the heat of the summer, from June 20th-23rd.  I checked award availability and found an absolute gem on the American Airlines award flight

American OneWorld Award Chart from AA.com

American OneWorld Award Chart from AA.com

This particular award allows for a trip from Asia Zone 1 (Japan, etc) to India and the Middle East for only 22.5k miles each way in economy, 30k AA miles each way in business class, or 45k in First.  Compare that to the Star Alliance options of United (45k/67.5k/87.5k) and US Airways (40k/60k/90k), as well as Delta (40k/60k), and you can see that this is an absolute steal!

Tokyo to Dubai Award Comparison

Tokyo to Dubai Award Comparison

Luckily, I had a decent sized stash of American AAdvantage miles stored up after a couple of credit card signing bonuses and a few flights to Europe from a couple years back, so I decided to redeem an award in business class.

With this award in mind, I needed to find availability for one of American’s OneWorld partners on the route.  I ‘ll make no bones about it – I wanted to try Cathay Pacific.  Ideally, I would have flown in first class, but since Cathay operates its HKG-DXB route with a two-class A330-300 aircraft, this would not be possible.  So instead, I settled on business class – a pretty sweet consolation price considering that this plane features arguably the best business class seat in the world.

Cathay Pacific's new Business Class. Picture:  Cathay Pacific

Cathay Pacific’s new Business Class. Picture: Cathay Pacific

So I headed over to the Qantas website to check award availability for Tokyo to Dubai.  I wanted to arrive on June 20th and depart the night of June 23rd.  I was pleased to see that the exact flights I wanted were available, so I jotted down the flight numbers and called them into American.  After a five minute phone call, I had secured a round-trip from Tokyo to Dubai via Hong Kong in Cathay Pacific business class for 60,000 AAdvantage miles and about $85 in taxes.

Tokyo to Dubai via Hong Kong

Tokyo to Dubai via Hong Kong

 Sewing it all together

So, now I had the Dubai portion booked.  Given that it was pretty close to the end of my previously planned Santiago trip, I decided to move the outbound DEN-NRT segment to arrive Tokyo the same day as my Cathay Pacific flight to Hong Kong and then Dubai.  I did want to spend about three days in Tokyo, so I added on several days in Tokyo after Dubai, and scheduled a return from NRT-DEN for June 27th.

I was able to adjust the dates of my Santiago flight due to the multitude of schedule changes to mesh nicely with the rest of my trip.  This left me getting into New York the morning of June 17th and a flight from Denver to Tokyo on June 18th.  So I looked for a flight from New York to Denver on the 17th.  I was able to find a very reasonable round-trip fare on United from NewYork-LaGuardia to Denver departing the late afternoon of the 17th and returning to Washington-Dulles the evening of June 27th.  Perfect.

After finding a very cheap Delta flight from Washington-Reagan (DCA) to JFK on the date of my outbound flight to Santiago on June 13th, I was all set.

Domestic flights -- the missing pieces to the puzzle

Domestic flights — the missing pieces to the puzzle

Adding to the sheer awesomeness of this trip, I was upgraded to United BusinessFirst on both the DEN-NRT and NRT-DEN flights on the 787!  That will equate to almost 24 hours in a lie-flat business seat, thanks to using a friend’s United Global Premier Upgrade (GPU) and a Mileage Upgrade (30,000 miles).

My ride to Tokyo:  The United 787 BusinessFirst cabin (from my first trip on the 787)

My ride to Tokyo: The United 787 BusinessFirst cabin (from my first trip on the 787)

The Final Product

About 38,000 miles of flying...

About 38,000 miles of flying…

DCA-JFK-GIG-SCL // SCL-GRU-JFK, LGA-DEN // DEN-NRT-HKG-DXB // DXB-HKG-HND // NRT-DEN-IAD

All this craziness resulted in a fifteen night trip, visiting five cities and three continents.  The final product looks something like this:

June 13:  Washington-Reagan (DCA) – New York (JFK) on a Delta CRJ-900 in economy comfort

June 13:  JFK – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (GIG) on a TAM A330-200 in economy

June 14:  9-hour layover in Rio!

June 14:  GIG – Santiago, Chile (SCL) on a TAM A320 in economy

June 14-16:  Two nights in Santiago at a hostel.

June 16:  SCL-Sao Paulo (GRU) on a LAN B767-300 in economy

June 16:  GRU – JFK on a TAM B777-300ER in economy

June 17:  New York-LaGuardia (LGA) – Denver (DEN) on a United B757-200 in economy plus

June 17:  Overnight in Denver at the Aloft Denver Airport

June 18:  DEN – Tokyo-Narita (NRT) on a United B787-8 in BusinessFirst

June 19:  NRT – Hong Kong (HKG) on a Cathay Pacific B777-300 in Business

June 20:  HKG – Dubai (DXB) on a Cathay Pacific A330-300 in Business

June 20-23:  Three nights in Dubai at the Park Hyatt, Dubai

June 23:  DXB – HKG on a Cathay Pacific A330-300 in Business

June 24: HKG – Tokyo-Hanaeda (HND) on a Cathay Pacific B777-300ER in Business

June 24-27:  Three nights in Tokyo at the Park Hyatt, Tokyo

June 27:  NRT-DEN on a United B787-8 in BusinessFirst

June 27:  DEN – Washington-Dulles on a United B757-200 in economy plus

Whew!  That’s a lot of travel, but I actually enjoy flying on airplanes – especially in business class.  In all, this trip will consist of five nights on airplanes and ten in hotels.  It will cover 38,856 total miles.  Since TAM is a member of Star Alliance (for now), this total trip will earn me 31,789 United Premier Qualifying Miles and about 36,761 United Redeemable miles from just the TAM and United segments.

Well, let’s start this thing!  I’ll try to give some timely first impressions throughout the course of my trip, and will follow it up with a full-fledged trip report afterwards.

EDIT: Well, as it turns out, weather did not cooperate with me, so I’ve already deviated from the above plan by heading to NYC a night early.  I’ll make a separate post on that whole fiasco later on.

DC to Dubai and Tokyo via… Santiago?: Introduction

Introduction
Planning
TAM Economy Class New York JFK – Rio de Janeiro
Rio de Janeiro
Santiago
LAN Economy Class Santiago – Sao Paulo
TAM Economy Class Sao Paulo – New York JFK
United BusinessFirst Denver to Tokyo Seattle (Emergency Landing)
United BusinessFirst on the 787 Seattle to Tokyo
Cathay Pacific Regional Business Class Tokyo Narita – Hong Kong
Cathay Pacific “The Wing” Business Class Lounge Hong Kong
Cathay Pacific Business Class Hong Kong – Dubai
Dubai, Day 1  (Traiteur Brunch, Park Hyatt Dubai, Burj Khalifa, Atlantis Palm Islands)
Dubai, Day 2 (Shark Dive at Dubai Aquarium, Burj Al Arab, 360)
Cathay Pacific Business Class Dubai – Hong Kong – Tokyo Haneda


If you read the title and found yourself wondering, “uhhh… what?”  Don’t worry, it’s not you.

It’s me.

Over the next few weeks, I will be chronicling my adventures through three different continents, over a dozen flights, and of course all the fun I have in the different cities I’ll be visiting.  This trip has ended up being a rather complex one to plan and organize, so I will  make  separate post that details how this thing ultimately came to fruition.  Planning for this trip has ultimately been in the works for well over a year thanks to the continual delays of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner.

United 787-8 Dreamliner

United’s 787-8 Dreamliner

I will detail parts of my trip that I find interesting — especially the international flights in premium cabins.  I’ll also highlight some of the other flights, possibly some hotels, and definitely my activities in the various destinations on this trip.  I may however, choose not to mention in detail the shorter, domestic flights — especially the one(s) in economy class  unless something unusual happens.

The path of my journey:  DCA-JFK-GIG-SCL-GRU-JFK, LGA-DEN-NRT-HKG-DXB-HND, NRT-DEN-IAD

The path of my journey: DCA-JFK-GIG-SCL-GRU-JFK, LGA-DEN-NRT-HKG-DXB-HND, NRT-DEN-IAD

This is my first trip report that will be covered on this blog, so please bear with me.  I’ll try to make the updates as timely as possible, but I also want to enjoy my vacation.  So content will be added, but I’m not sure at what pace I’ll be able to publish it.

Enjoy!

Here goes nothin’…

So, here we go.

I wasn’t sure if I’d ever get to this point, but I’m giving it a shot.  Time to start my own travel blog!  Friends and family have been saying that I should do this for a while, and I finally have taken them up on it.

Enjoying First Class on the Korean Air A380

Enjoying First Class on the Korean Air A380

Right now, I’m lucky if I have the viewership of one or two people. But that’s okay.  In the coming days, I will work on getting some content populated onto the site so that there’s something to look at.  Please bear with me, as I continue to setup my site and simultaneously add content.

After thinking about this blog for several weeks, I still haven’t come up with an overly clear direction for it, but I will instead mention bits and pieces of travel related tidbits.  I’ve been traveling all over the country and world for the better part of the last two years thanks to a combination of searching for ridiculous deals, and collecting an absurd amount of miles and points.

In the coming days, weeks, and months I aim to bring the reader along with me as I travel all over.  At the same time, I will provide insight into the strategies and methods that allow me to travel so frequently, highlight awesome deals, and provide a perspective on travel industry-related news and current events.

Any feedback is appreciated.  Thanks!

Sean